Our aim......

 


St Peter and St Paul's is a community which exists for two basic reasons: to worship God and to serve the area around Syston. We gather to pray and worship, to draw near to God that He might polish the tarnish off our fragile lives and restore his image in us. The congregation is varied and mixed, so you'll fit in just fine!  


We're keen that people should feel that St Peter and St Paul's is a safe space to come and see - we
promise we won't jump on you and make you join something! And we don't claim to have all the answers - but in our faith we've found a framework and friendship with God which is helping us to make sense of life as we experience it. Christians talk about God as a mystery - not a puzzle to be solved, but a relationship to be entered into and an experience to be lived.




Our aim is to create a community where people are encouraged to meet God and respond in appropriate ways. We want to foster mature disciples who live out their faith day to day.


Lots of different things flow from that:

We think the Mass (or Eucharist*) is at the centre of what we do and how we pray, because it's what Jesus told us to do. We believe that we are created and called to imitate God - so...

•What we see God doing is what he wants us to do...

•The way God treats us is the way we should strive to treat others...

•The way God loves his world and creation is the way we should feel about the world.....


Individually and together we are moulded and informed by the Bible. We are trying hard to love others as we experience God loving us. We are on a journey together as a community: we don't have all the answers and we may not understand everything, but we feel that we stand a better chance of working that out together rather than alone and individually...


We strive to be a truly open-minded  and inclusive Anglican church - so not everybody agrees about everything, but together and individually we are trying to do our best to follow Christ.



*The Eucharist (also sometimes called the Mass or Holy Communion) is the central act of worship that commemorates the Last Supper of Jesus with his disciples. On the night before his death Jesus consecrated bread and wine and gave them to his disciples, saying “this is my body” and “this is my blood.” He also commanded his followers to repeat this action in his memory, and the Eucharist traditionally involves consecration of bread and wine by the clergy and their consumption by worshipers.